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Department of English
 
Graduate Courses

ENGL 301  Introduction to Bibliography and Research Methods 3.0; 3 cr.
An introduction to bibliography and research methodologies in the study of language or literary studies. Annually.

ENGL 302 Literatures of the Middle Ages (former ENGL 302) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course that covers major works of medieval literature, with attention to both form and cultural context. Some attention to original languages of texts may be given. Readings may vary from term to term.

ENGL 303 Early Modern Literatures (former ENGL 302) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course that covers major works of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature, including theater, with attention to both form and cultural context. Readings may vary from term to term.

ENGL 304 British Literatures (former ENGL 303) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course that covers major works of British literature, including theater, from the eighteenth-century to the contemporary period. Themes and readings may vary from term to term. (Formerly ENGL 302/303)

ENGL 305 American Literatures (former ENGL 304) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course that covers major literary works of American literature, including theater and film, with some emphasis given to relations among the wide array of American literary traditions. Themes and readings may vary from term to term. (Formerly ENGL 304)

ENGL 306 Transnational Literatures (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships among texts—including theater, film, and other narrative and visual forms—emerging from a range of different locales, with an emphasis on historical contexts of migration, diaspora, and crisis.

ENGL 307 Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships among texts circulating between the colonized and formerly colonized world, and sites of imperial and neo-imperial power.

ENGL 308 Literatures of the Global South (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships among texts that circulate through networks that link different sites of the colonized and formerly colonized world.

ENGL 309 World Literature (former ENGL 325) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships among significant texts from different origins, time periods, and genres, as well as their resonance in global contexts via translation, adaptation, and rewriting.

ENGL 310 Literature, Technology, and Media (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships between established—e.g., theater, print, film and visual media—and emergent media, and the changing conventions of genre, period, and form. Themes and readings may vary, but might include interrogations of the history of cinema, theatrical, and literary culture, the representation of science in transnational modernisms, or alterations in reading and reception in relation to digital media.

ENGL 311 Literature and Material Culture (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring relationships between literary culture and the physical manifestations of culture in made objects. Themes and readings may vary, but might include examinations of capitalism and consumer culture as manifest in the representation of the domestic interior; relations between the visual arts and literary representation; theatrical or cinematic representation, or the representation of waste in literary modernism.

ENGL 312 Literature, Gender, and Sexuality (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring literary cultures from the perspective of gender and sexuality as interpretive frameworks and representational strategies. Themes and readings may vary, but might include considerations of third world feminisms, gender and performance theory, queer and post-queer theory, affect theory, rhetorics of the body, and new materialist approaches to the study of gender and sexuality.

ENGL 313 Literature and Translation (former ENGL 326) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course exploring translation as a technology of literary production and meaning making. Works in translation will be considered through the lens of theories of translation and their practical applications.

ENGL 314 Special Topics in Literature (former ENGL 306) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course that addresses aspects literature—including theater, cinema, and digital media—or literary and cultural theory that are not typically addressed in other courses offered by the department. Topics vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 315 Tutorial in Literature (former ENGL 305) 3.0; 3 cr.
A course offered to students on an individual basis. The topic can include any aspect of literary study.

ENGL 327  Sociolinguistics 3.0; 3 cr.
A course intended to provide an in-depth analysis of the issues related to the study of the interaction between language and society. This course covers such topics as geographical and social dialects, multilingualism, language and gender, ethnography of speaking, discourse analysis, language planning, and language attitudes. Annually.

ENGL 329  Grammatical Studies in Old and Middle English Literature 3.0; 3 cr.
A close reading and grammatical examination of selected texts in the original. Exact content to be determined by the instructor. Annually.

ENGL 341  Phonology 3.0; 3 cr.
A survey of theories of phonological description including phonemics, distinctive features, and generative phonology; an application of these theories to actual linguistic data from various languages with concentration by each student on one specific problem. Annually.

ENGL 342  Theoretical Linguistics 3.0; 3 cr.
A study of readings in advanced grammar that have contributed to the formulation of theories of language description; e.g., transformational grammar, stratificational grammar, generative semantics, pragmatics, government, and binding. Annually.

ENGL 344  Graduate Tutorial in Linguistics 3.0; 3 cr.
A tutorial offered to students on an individual basis. The topics can include any aspect of the study of linguistics that both instructor and student agree on. Annually.

ENGL 345  Language Acquisition 3.0; 3 cr.
A survey of studies in first and second language acquisition. Emphasis is placed on stages of acquisition and the strategies used by children in acquiring their native language. Comparisons between first and second language acquisition are drawn with implication for language teaching. Annually.

ENGL 346  Issues in Applied Linguistics 3.0; 3 cr.
A course whose topic varies from semester to semester. It deals with major topics and issues in language study such as multilingualism and multiculturalism, assessment and evaluation, language and education, and intercultural communication. Annually.

ENGL 399  MA Thesis 9 cr.

ENGL 338  Writing in The Disciplines 
(This course is offered ONLY for Graduate students who are not English Language and Literature Majors)
The main purpose of this course is to prepare students for graduate-level academic writing. Topics include academic writing style, academic writing in different disciplines, accuracy and clarity in writing, the writing process, argumentation, referencing and documentation styles, plagiarism, paraphrasing, summarizing, critiquing, and evaluating sources. Each semester.

The requirements are specified in the AUB graduate catalogue    
For more information about graduate studies in AUB, check out the following links :Online Graduate Application , Graduate Council 

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