Book Launch of the edited volume Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture

Professor Rami Zurayk, Department of Landscape Design and Ecosystem Management (FAFS-LDEM) together with Program Coordinator and Instructor Rachel Bahn, Food Security Program (FAFS-FSP), organized the launch of the edited volume Crisis and Conflict in Agriculture (published September, 2018, by CABI). The even took place on Thursday, November 1 in Michel and Sherine Bayoud Lecture Hall. 


The event was opened by FSP Executive Committee Chair and Assistant Professor Martin Keulertz, who welcomed attendees and offered brief observations on the volume and its contributors. Two of the volume’s editors, Zurayk and Bahn, detailed highlights and contributions of the volume to the field and the literature. Dr. Tariq Tell, Assistant Professor of Political Studies and Public Administration (AUB) emphasized the theoretical aspects of the book and its connection to ongoing political dynamics in the MENA region and a Q&A session followed. The event concluded with a reception in the Nour Dajani FAFS Faculty Lounge. AUB faculty members, staff, and students can access the volume as an e-book through the AUB Libraries; hard-copies can be purchased through the CABI bookshop​.




About the volume, from the publisher's description:

The volume Conflict and Crisis in Agriculture "sets out to explore the dialectic relating agriculture, crisis and conflict, and attempts to expand the knowledge on these interactions. Part 1 of the volume (chapters 1-6) discusses thematic issues and methodological approaches to understanding the intersection of agriculture, crisis and conflict. Part 2 (chapters 7-20) provides case studies that take a detailed approach to understanding agricultural contexts facing crisis and conflict, or the role played by agriculture within crisis and conflict. Studies are selected from areas that might be expected to feature in such a volume (the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and Latin America) as well as less obvious regions where conflict within agriculture refers not to widespread violence or wars but rather latent or simmering crisis (Central Asia and Europe). Crises stemming from politically-driven violence, natural disasters and climate change are covered, as well as competition over resources." ​