Suzanne Enzerink, Professor of American Studies and Media Studies

​​suzanne 2 2.jpgOriginally from the Netherlands, Suzanne Enzerink is an American Studies scholar working in the fields of film/media history, gender studies, and critical race studies. Her focus is on the 20th and 21st century United States in transnational perspective. Suzanne received her PhD in American Studies from Brown University in 2019, where she was a 2017-2018 fellow at the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America and a 2018-2019 fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women​. 

Her work has appeared in publications including American Quarterly, Another Gaze: A Feminist Film Journal, and Black Perspectives. As part of a multi-institutional effort, Suzanne also co-authored an interactive digital high school curriculum on Japanese American incarceration in World War II, which was supported by a JACLS grant and was published by The Choices Program in 2018.  

Her book project, "Give Me Color: Ambiguity as Cold War Critique, 1950-1967" explores changing casting practices in Hollywood during the early Cold War. Women of color increasingly appeared on screen, a change sparked by two oppositional camps. On the one hand, government-sponsored films increasingly sought to project a global image of the United States as democratic and inclusive amidst Cold War anxiety about the cultural ascent of the USSR. On the other hand, film writers and directors also spotlighted them in dissident works—often produced overseas to avoid censure—that critiqued persistent racism and inequality in the US. Suzanne's archival work for this project has taken her to Los Angeles, London, Frankfurt, and Paris. 

Suzanne earned her B.A. and M.A. in American Studies from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, and prior to her Ph.D. studies was the Richard M. Levine teaching fellow in History at Phillips Academy Andover in Andover, Massachusetts. She also studied abroad at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 

Suzanne's teaching interests are in transnational American Studies, film and media studies, and gender studies. At Brown, she received the Reginald D. Archambault Award for Excellence in Teaching. She is eager to work with and mentor both undergraduate and MA students, and welcomes inquiries from students working in the aforementioned fields.