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Department of English
 
Undergraduate Studies

The requirements for a BA degree in Language or Literature are 90 credits for students entering the department at the sophomore level, including 39 credits of major English courses.

Both literature and language majors may also take courses leading to the teaching diploma. The requirements for the teaching diploma are specified under the catalogue section Department of Education.

For university requirements, please check the catalogue section Department of English.

BA in Literature

Mission

The mission of the B.A. in Literature in the Department of English is to provide a solid background in British, American, and other Anglophone literary texts, traditions, and cultures, as well as their continued relevance in a humanistic and liberal arts-based education. Cultivated by a community of teachers, scholars, and writers, undergraduate students engage with an ensemble of critical issues and develop individual interpretive theories and scholarly approaches. Upon graduation, students will be equipped to continue advanced study in English Literature, or other related disciplines, or to pursue a variety of career options in education, media, and communications.

The literature program in the Department of English has a dual purpose. It provides the humanistic discipline and training necessary for those who wish to obtain an education based on wide reading and literary study, and at the same time it provides a structure of courses useful to those who intend to pursue study in English literature. The literature program, while exposing students to the major authors, works, and movements of English and American literature through extensive class discussion and the writing of critical essays in each course, seeks also to teach students to become perceptive, critical and analytical readers.

Program Learning Outcomes

Knowledge of Discipline Specific Content

1. Identify the historical, social, and formal contexts of texts
2. Demonstrate awareness of canonicity in light of the history of the discipline
3. Analyze the aesthetic frameworks and cultural values that shape the creation and reception of literary texts

Critical Thinking

4. Apply critical and theoretical approaches in the interpretation of texts
5. Define and execute research projects based on texts
6. Produce critical arguments in a variety of formats

Requirements

The new requirements for literature majors beginning Fall 2014-15 are as follows: ENGL 205, ENGL 207, ENGL 209 (formerly
201), ENGL 212, ENGL 221, ENGL 229, ENGL 238, one comparative literature course chosen from
ENGL 240-243 and four additional courses chosen from among those numbered ENGL 210 to
ENGL 291 and 294 In their senior year, they must take ENGL 292.

New recommended sequence for Literature majors: Literature majors are recommended to take
ENGL 229 in their first year of study as well as ENGL 205, 207 and 209 (formerly 201) while they
are taking ENGL 203. Once they have completed ENGL 203, they may take ENGL 221, preferably
in the second year. They are recommended to take ENGL 238 immediately following ENGL 204.
ENGL 292 must be taken in the senior year.

BA in Language

Mission

The mission of the B.A. program in Language in the Department of English is to promote a multifaceted approach to language. The program provides students with a foundational understanding of the principles and issues within current approaches to language and introduces them to various aspects of the structure, use, and learning of English. Through teaching and mentoring, the program encourages the students to apply their analytical skills to their experience outside the classroom, and prepares them for employment in areas related to English language teaching and publishing, and for the pursuit of advanced degrees in linguistics.

The language program gives the English language major the essential foundations of post-modern linguistic readings as well as contextual selections in literature. The language courses are intended to provide an appropriate linguistic background for prospective teachers of English and a preparation for those planning to pursue graduate work in linguistics.

Program Learning Outcomes

Knowledge of Discipline Specific Content

1. Demonstrate knowledge of representative texts of various Anglophone traditions.
2. Demonstrate understanding of the structure and functions of language.
3. Analyze aspects of language development, variation and change, as a function of place, time and social context.

Critical Thinking

4. Evaluate and apply theoretical approaches to the study of language.
5. Define and execute research projects based on language.
6. Produce critical arguments in a variety of formats.

Requirements

The requirements for language majors are as follows: ENGL 227 (Introduction to Language), ENGL 228 (Phonetics), ENGL 229 (History of the English Language), ENGL 230 (Language in Society) or ENGL 232 (Psycholinguistics), ENGL 237 (Creative Non-Fiction) or ENGL 238 (Advanced Academic Writing), ENGL 231 (Modern English Grammar) or ENGL 294 (Advanced English Grammar), and three additional courses chosen from among the department’s language offerings; in literature, ENGL 212 and two courses chosen from ENGL 201, ENGL 205, and ENGL 207, and one additional course from among those numbered ENGL 210 to ENGL 292, including creative writing courses.

Last update: 27 May 13

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