A study on the response of National Health Systems to Refugees crisis: A 1 Million dollar multi-country project, led by Professor Fadi El Jardali from FHS

​​Professor Fadi El-Jardali from the Health Management and Policy Department (HMPD) of the Faculty of Health Sciences is awarded research study on the response of National Health Systems to Refugees crisis by DFID/ESRC/MRC/Wellcome Trust Health Systems Research Initiative.

Launched with the presence of all partners and collaborators at the American University of Beirut, the 3-day meeting (April 29, 30 and May 1st 2019) was a kick-start to launch the multi-country study and develop the methodologies and modalities for data collection.

This interdisciplinary research convenes researchers from different disciplines and backgrounds including health policy and systems researchers, political scientists, sociologists, economists, anthropologists and researchers working on refugees and humanitarian crises.

Professor El-Jardali is leading the project along with co-principal investigators Dr. Sara Bennett and Dr. Paul Spiegel and co-Investigators from:

  • Johns Hopkins University in the United States: Sarah Parkinson, and Yusra Shawar

  • Jordan University for Science and Technology in Jordan: Dr. Leila Akhu Zaheya and Dr. Rowaida Al Maaitah

  • Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network: Mohanad Al-Nsour

  • Makerere University in Uganda: Christopher Orach and Sarah Ssali.

  • American University of Beirut: Fouad Fouad and Omar Dewachi (Faculty of Health Sciences), Rima Majed and Nisreen Salti (Faculty of Arts and Sciences)

The FHS team will lead the work in Lebanon, Jordan, and Uganda with a budget of 1 million dollars over a period of three years.

This multi-country study aims to provide critical evidence to inform public policies and decision-making at the national, regional and global levels concerning the integration of refugees into national health systems, and ultimately enhance equity and strengthen sustainable health services for refugees and host communities. The project is timely in the light of the move towards “humanitarian-development nexus" and the changes in patterns of mobility and emergency duration. ​