The Victoria & Albert Museum acquires 'Stuck Stick'

​The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London, the world's leading museum of art and design, has announced a series of acquisitions of works by a range of talented artists and designers from across the region for th​e museum's permanent collection. We are proud that the ‘Stuck Stick’ series, by MSFEA’s faculty Rana Haddad and Pascal Hachem at the architecture and design department, will be joining the museum’s permanent collection.​ This is part of a broader long-term approach to embed the work of Middle Eastern practitioners within the V&A's permanent collection and programming.

'Stuck Stick' is a system to hang objects in any sp​ace without having to pierce a floor or a ceiling. Held in place by tension - the pressure exerted by the rod between floor and ceiling - keeps a variety of objects including vases, candles, vintage mirrors, plants, coats and more afloat in space. The system offers a flexible solution, which can endlessly transform a space whilst at the same time elevating every day, simple objects in a playful way.

This work will be soon displayed at the V&A. The artists were also invited to give a workshop that will be held at the V&A Museum of Childhood​. The theme will explore imagination, playfulness and design as a creative process. 

As put by the curator Salma Tuqan: “Rana Haddad and Pascal Hachem's authentic approach reads like a candid love story with their city. Growing up with the pervading uncertainty of the Lebanese civil war imprinted on both the importance of living in the present and appreciating the everyday. Their practice is a conscious return to less-is-more. This attitude spills into their products and playful interventions, bringing into play and adapting existing artisanal knowhow in an effort to positively fuel, propel and keep their city alive."

Each piece by Haddad and Hachem is drawn from a challenging spatial constraint or addresses a social trend, questioning the position of design and its potential social impact. They deal with notions of scale and genuineness in order to produce unique work serving a multitude of miscellaneous functions. What distinguishes their work is the way they appropriate a ready-made, in the same manner, as they tend to give a different life to a very commonly used object.​