Dry Reforming Research Group

The dry reforming of methane is a process that produces syngas (a mixture of CO and H2) through the high-temperature reaction of methane with CO2 in the presence of catalysts via the reaction 

CH4 + CO2 →2CO + 2H2.

This process has not yet reached commercialization due to catalyst damage from carbon formation.

Our research, in collaboration with the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick, aims at understanding how carbon forms on the catalyst and how to avoid it while maintaining good performance, and developing  stable and cheap catalysts for this process.

We are currently investigating three kinds of catalysts:

  • Systematically optimized conventional catalysts

  • Supported interstitial alloy catalysts

  • Liquid phase sulfur passivated catalysts

In addition, we model the reactive system to predict optimal, time-dependent operating conditions.

Carbon-fiber.jpg
Figure 1: Carbon fiber growth on the surface of a catalyst particle​

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Figure 2: High temperature gas phase catalysis test rig with on-line analysis​​

Researchers involved 

Dr Mohammad Ahmad (AUB)
Dr Joseph Zeaiter (AUB)
Dr James J. Leahy (University of Limerick)
Dr Witold Kwapinski (University of Limerick)
Eng. Nicolas Abdel Karim Aramouni (AUB)
Eng. Ghadeer Khansa (AUB)

Relevant publications from the lab

  • Azzam, M., et al., Dynamic optimization of dry reformer under catalyst sintering using neural networks. Energy Conversion and Management, 2018. 157: p. 146-156.

  • Abdel Karim Aramouni, N., et al., Catalyst design for dry reforming of methane: Analysis review. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2018. 82: p. 2570-2585.

  • Abdel Karim Aramouni, N., et al., Thermodynamic analysis of methane dry reforming: Effect of the catalyst particle size on carbon formation. Energy Conversion and Management, 2017. 150: p. 614-622. 

Link to the Bernal Institute website 
http://bernalinstitute.com/

Contact:
Mohammad Ahmad​​