Bibliography and further resources

​​​​​​​The following books and resources provide more information on the topics covered in this document:

 ​Alley, M. (1998). The craft of scientific writing. New York: Springer.

American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual. (6th ed. ). Washington D C: APA.

APA Guidelines for Tables and Figures (n.d.). Retrieved from https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/19/ and https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/20/

Beer, D. F., & McMurrey, D. A. (2014). A guide to writing as an engineer. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Berger, R. E. (2014). A Scientific Approach to Writing for Engineers and Scientists. Somerset: Wiley.

Donnell, J., Jeter, S. M., MacDougall, C., & Snedeker, J. (2016). Writing style and standards in undergraduate reports. Glen Allen, VA: College Publishing.

Irish, R., & Weiss, P. E. (2013). Engineering communication: From principles to practice. Don Mills, Ontario, Canada: Oxford University Press.

Johnson-Sheehan, R. (2015). Technical Communication Strategies for Today. Global Edition. (2nd ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Schimel, J. (2012). Writing science: How to write papers that get cited and proposals that get funded. New York: Oxford University Press.

Strunk, W. (1976). The elements of style. New York: Macmillan.

The Civil Engineering Writing Project. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.cewriting.org/

Toulmin, S. E. (2008). The uses of argument. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Wolfe, J. (2007). Writing about Data. The Engineering Information Foundation.​​