OSB takes research collaborations to new heights

OSB researchers can now connect with leading international scholars through influential academic visits and high-impact travel grant initiatives to strengthen faculty research collaborations.

Through High-Impact Research Visits, designed to cultivate international partnerships with research co-authors, three OSB faculty members traveled oversees to work with their associates to advance or finalize their research.

Daou.pngDr. Alain Daou, assistant professor of entrepreneurship, visited his research coauthors in the University of Ghent in Belgium to investigate firm strategic goals, open innovation practices, and innovation performance. “Time spent in Ghent gave me the opportunity to focus on my research project," said Daou. “Research visits are essential because having dedicated time to sit face-to-face with my co-author allows me to achieve more and be more efficient."

Judi.pngSimilarly, Dr. Houanida El Judi, assistant professor of marketing, visited her coauthor in KEDGE Business School in Marseille, France regarding a series of research examining “Beauty and the Social Imaginary: A Semio-Socio Historical Analysis of the Lebanese Techno-Cosmetized Beauty Market." El Jurdi believes that the research visit was a great opportunity for seclusion and concentration away from distractions and non-research commitments. “It was a chance to collect thoughts and have the clarity of mind to focus on one project and one project only."

L.O.pngAdditionally, assistant professor of organizational behavior Dr. Lina Daouk-Oyry and her two PhD students went on a research visit to Tilburg University in the Netherlands to analyze data on evidence-based management and job crafting: “We initiated research collaboration through a PhD project between OSB and EHMU from AUB, and Tilburg University, to study the concept of job crafting at the micro-level. The purpose of my visit to Tilburg was to conduct research meetings with my collaborators. We explore individual differences among nurses and their interplay with job crafting behaviors to formulate a clearer image of the role that job crafting has in enhancing nurses' personal and professional lives."

Associate dean for research and faculty development Dr. Yusuf Sidani, looks forward to these research initiatives which, in his opinion, are an opportunity for faculty to take some time off, focus on a research project with few distractions, and make progress that otherwise would not have been possible. “I am happy that some professors have seized this opportunity, and I am confident that this will result in substantially advancing their work. From the feedback received, this initiative has been greatly valued by OSB faculty."

Another opportunity for faculty looking to collaborate with top-notch researchers is the initiative called Building Research Bridges. As part of this high-impact research visit, the school had the privilege to host Dr. Mark Soliman from Marshall School of Business at University of Southern California. Soliman is a distinguished expert in financial reporting information, trading strategies, capital markets, and debt ratings voluntarily disclosure. Winner of the Notable Contribution to Accounting Literature in 2009, Dr. Soliman gave a talk at OSB on “CEO Narcissism and Non-GAAP Earnings: Looking Good More Often with Lower Quality Exclusions."

The school also hosted Dr. Susan Marlow, professor of entrepreneurship from the Haydn Green Institution of Enterprise and Innovation at the University of Nottingham. Dr. Marlow, a holder of the prestigious Queens Award for Enterprise Promotion, is a world-renowned expert on entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviors with a particular interest in gender and human resource management. Her presentation at OSB included a discussion on “Digital Enterprise - A Great Leveler or Just the Same Old Story?"

“Such an initiative is very important for our faculty members to interact with world-class researchers, and get updated on the latest developments in various business fields" Sidani asserted, “it helps in further building a research culture at the school".